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On our site we learn (from How many hadiths are in کتب الاربعه ? (Main Shia Books)) that the most authentic hadith collection from the (twelver) shi'a perspective are:

  1. Kitab al-Kafi الکافى of al-Kulayni.
  2. Man la yahduruhu al-Faqih من لا يحضره الفقيه of ibn Babawayh known as Sheikh Saduq.
  3. Tahdeed al-Ahkam تهذيب الأحكام and
  4. Al-Istibsaar fyma ikhtalafa min al-Akhbar الاستبصار فيما اختلف من الأخبار (both) of sheikh at-Tusi.

(The Arabic Wikipedia site -see here- arranged them in a different order where 2. was shifted at the end of the list of these four books, so I'm unclear if there's actually a ranking, but as far as I know al-Kafi has the highest reputation among these books).

Similar to the sunni's there are certainly other hadith collections which are also commonly known and used. (The following book titles are taken from this Arabic Wikipedia site, beside this Wikipedia is the major source of the provided information in this post) Among them are books of rather modern scholars such as:

  • Wasaail a-Shi'a وسائل الشيعة of al-Hurr al-'Amili
    (which seems a book about the fiqh of hadith: the author tried to conclude from a couple of narrations a fiqh ruling)
  • Bihar al-Anwar بحار الأنوار of al-Majlisi
    (which is an imense collection of hadith and narration taht reachs about 110.000 narrations)
  • Mustadrak al-Wasaa'il مستدرك الوسائل ومستنبط المسائل of al-Muhadith Noori
    (this is basically as the title implies a compendium for the book of al-Hurr al-'Amili which includes about 23.000 more narrations)
  • al-Waafy الوافي of al-Kashani
    (which seems to be a collection of the four books, where the ahadith have been put in order based on fiqh topics and commented and explained by the author the book should contain about 50.000 hadith according wikipedia)

and books of early scholars such as:

  • The Book of Sulaym ibn Qays كتاب سليم بن قيس الهلالي
    (a loyal companion of at least four imams: 'Ali () and his sons al-Hassan () and al-Hussayn () and (his son) Ali Zayn al-'Abidyn () and Muhammad al-Baqir ())
    which should be one of the earliest sources.
  • Al-Amali الأمالي also known as al-Majalis المجالس of sheikh al-Mufyd
    (is a book of dictations of 42 encouters between him and his students during Ramadan between 404 a.H. and 411 a.H. excluding the year 405 a.H. and 406 a.H.)

  • Al-Khisaal الخصال
    (a book of 1255 hadith which contains "numbers")

  • 'Oyoun Akhbar Al-Ridha عیون اخبار الرضا (a book containing narrations of and on the 8th shi'a imam 'Ali ibn Musa ar-Rida)

  • Amali as-Saduq أمالي الصدوق (see al-Amali of al-Mufyd) (a book which includes ahadith which were dictated by sheikh Saduq during 97 encouters with his students in al-Ray, Nishapur and Mashhad)
    Note the last three books are all woirks of ibn Babawayh also known as sheikh Saduq.

I'd like to know to what extent these books are considered to contain authentic ahadith and narrations based on reliable shi'a hadith authorities.

P.s.: This question might be a bit too broad please help me improve it with constructive suggestions!

  • 1
    Wikishia that I cited in my answer is a great official source of information on anything related to Shia Islam. Many entries have Arabic and English versions. As for Hadith works you can check this directory: تصنيف:كتب الحديث عند الشيعة – infatuated Aug 5 at 15:17
  • @infatuated at first site I thought what's the difference between this and Wikipedia, but then I found out that there's much more content. – Medi1Saif Aug 6 at 5:07
  • Oh, yes, there's a big difference. The site is a subsidiary of an assembly of world Shia scholars which has been founded under the auspice of Iran's leader Ayatollah Khamenei. Hence the content is official, high quality and objective, written by scholars. – infatuated Aug 6 at 5:13

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