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A loose definition in English is that a Nabi (pl. Anbiya) is a Prophet, and a Rasul (pl. Rusul) is a Messenger. Linguistically, a Nabi is someone who has been given revelation or news (of an important nature, immediately concerning themselves or their communities). A Rasul, linguistically, is someone given a message to deliver. There are two main classical ...


14

In Islam, we have a concept called mithaaq, which means "heavy covenant/contract." According to this understanding, all of humanity met Allah (God) before we were created, and we agreed to follow His rules. Therefore, we all have a fitrah (innate nature) to the values of Islam, because we are all born as Muslims. More specifically, this can be extracted ...


13

"Jaza" (جزا) is the Arabic verb meaning "May he give reward". The root is "Jazaun" means "reward". Although the meaning is such, literally, it's in past tense, meaning HE REWARDED. That's how a number of du'as are stated. "ka" (ك) here means "to/for you". So, "jazaka" (جزاك) means "He will reward you" "Allah" here explicitly refers Allah as the doer (...


11

À la Wikipedia: The religion of peace is a political neologism used as a description of Islam. After the September 11, 2001 attacks, some politicians described Islam as a "religion of peace" in an effort to differentiate between Islamic terrorists, islamism, and non-violent Muslims. While Islam itself has always contained elements that favour peace,...


10

A kaffir is somone who disbelives even when they know the truth. Those who disbelieved among the People of the Scripture and the polytheists were not to be parted [from misbelief] until there came to them clear evidence - The aya above says that somone will not be a kaffir unless clear truth is provided, once somone knows the truth and decides to ...


10

[Surat al-Ikhlaas] Say, "He is Allah , [who is] One, Allah , the Eternal Refuge. He neither begets nor is born, Nor is there to Him any equivalent." Using common pronouns to refer to God The first line of the above surah is one of many examples where God refers to Himself using the simple pronoun "هو" (He), the same pronoun used by Arabic speakers ...


9

Etymologically, the archaic English "mussulman" is derived from the Ottoman Turkish (and earlier Persian) "mosalmun [mosælmɒn] " (look it up here) , which both mean "Muslim". The modern "muslim" is (obviously) derived directly from the Arabic term. As to why the Turkish form gained enough traction in English to become its own word, I can only guess, but ...


9

Yes and no. "Allah" is the Arabic word for God. However, in Arabic there is a distinction between "Allah" (God, i.e. "The" God), and "Ilah" (god, i.e "a" god), a distinction which is easily lost in English where the same word (capitalization notwithstanding) is used for both. Both terms are used, for example, in the shahadah when Muslims say "Laa ilaha ...


9

"a.s." is short for "'Alayhi al-Salaam" (عليه السلام), which is an Arabic phrase meaning "Peace be upon him". It is often used by Muslims after the names of the prophets as a term of respect.


8

Good question. The origin of the term comes from something the Prophet Muhammad (saws) said about everyone being born "on their nature" (the word used in the hadith is "fitrah"). Meaning that people are born with an innate ability to recognize their Lord and to submit to Him. The hadith continues by saying that after birth, it is the parents who make the ...


7

Kuffar or kafir means "the one who covers on something". It comes from the Arabic root كفر. If we get deep into its etymology, it was used for the meaning of "a farmer covering on the seeds in the field by scattering soil on them". Kafir is someone who covers the truth (even though there was satisfying evidence(s) (beyyine) for it) in his/her conscience, ...


7

There are two narrations of Hadith Jibreel, when angel Jibreel comes to the Prophet (peace be upon him) in human form and asks him some questions. These questions include: What is Islam (who are Muslims?) What is Eman (who are Mu'mins?) What is Ihsaan? The two narrations switch up the order of Islam vs. eman. Therefore, some scholars have said that Islam (...


7

These words have related but different meanings, and the same word may not have exactly the same literal meaning in all places in Quran. Let me give an example. In verse 49:14, Quran states that: قَالَتِ الْأَعْرَابُ آمَنَّا ۖ قُل لَّمْ تُؤْمِنُوا وَلَٰكِن قُولُوا أَسْلَمْنَا وَلَمَّا يَدْخُلِ الْإِيمَانُ فِي قُلُوبِكُمْ ۖ وَإِن تُطِيعُوا اللَّهَ ...


7

I searched the whole Quran for the word Muslim. It seems there is no explicit definition of a Muslim, although it has been called to different people in different situations. Among them the following verses seem to match your question better than others: 1) قُلْ يَا أَهْلَ الْكِتَابِ تَعَالَوْا إِلَىٰ كَلِمَةٍ سَوَاءٍ بَيْنَنَا وَبَيْنَكُمْ أَلَّا ...


6

A Prophet is one who has received revelation from Allah but is not required or told to spread it, While a messenger receives revelation and is told to spread it. And every Rasool is a Nabi, but not every Nabi is a Rasool. Nooh (peace be upon him) as is mentioned in the Hadith of Shafa'ah is the first Rasool: يَا نُوحُ أَنْتَ أَوَّلُ الرُّسُلِ إِلَى ...


6

A saint or Wali in Islam refers to a friend of Allah, Allah has said in the Quran that his friends, Awliya' will have nor fear nor shall they grieve. أَلَآ إِنَّ أَوۡلِيَآءَ ٱللَّهِ لَا خَوۡفٌ عَلَيۡهِمۡ وَلَا هُمۡ يَحۡزَنُونَ (٦٢) Behold! verily on the friends of Allah there is no fear, nor shall they grieve; (62) Read: 1


6

States of permissibility or rulings in (Sunni) Islam fall under 5 categories (7 for Hanafis). One of those states is haram (impermissible) and the rest are at varying levels of permissibility (halal): Obligatory (fard or wajib) Recommended (mandub or mustahabb) Neither recommended nor disliked (mubah) Disliked (makruh) All the above categories are "halal." ...


6

Definition: كرار : عكس كلمه فرار الذي يفر من المعارك كرار : شديد الكر والهجوم في القتال Almaany Definition According to this definition, and numerous other ones, Karrar is an Arabic word that means one who fights and attacks with power in battle. Also, Karrar is the opposite word of Farrar (فرار) which is one who escapes cowardly from battle. ...


6

Due to the limitations of transliteration it's hard to tell exactly, but you're presumably asking about the Arabic phrase شفيع المذنبين (Shafi'u-l-Mudhnabin), which literally means the Intercessor of Sinners, as in someone who acts on the behalf of sinners (e.g. to defend them against the final judgement). Shafi'u-l-Mudhnabin is a phrase that is sometimes ...


6

"Semite" is an ethnic description (originally referring to the peoples that spoke semitic languages), "Muslim" a religious one. The confusion only arises because "Jewish" is both an ethnic and a religious description. There are non-semitic Jews however, in particular: converts from other ethnicities. While many Muslims are Arabs, many are not, so calling non-...


5

It means may Allah give you reward.


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If a person makes something Waqf, it ceases to be his property, and neither he nor anybody else can either gift it or sell it to any person. Also, no one can inherit anything out of it. Source If you can understand Arabic there is a scholar whose name is Abdullah bin Bayyah. He made a lot of research in this topic. He also has an english version of his site ...


5

Surah No 51 - Ayah No 47 says And the heaven We built with Our own powers (aydin) and indeed We go on expanding it. It should be remembered that the concept of the continuous expansion of the universe is exclusive to the Quran. No other Divine scriptures even remotely hint at it. The discovery that the universe is constantly expanding is of prime ...


5

When the Quran was written: The word for Universe did not really exist in Arabic just like the word Universe did not exist in English before physicists. The Word universe meant something else like "all that exists". So the Quran may not say the 'Alkoon' because at the time it was written, that word did not denote "the universe". The word for 'sky' is the ...


5

Shafa'ah means asking for forgiveness, Prophet Mohammad and Mala'eka can do shafa'ha, and no , it is not shirk , as there is this Hadith that tells us that there is a Doa' said after Azan , if we said it , we receive prophet's Mohammad shafa'ah . So basically , saying the Doa' is asking for the shafa'ah which is not shirk. As for others who can shafa'ah : ...


5

The Muslim is the person who has accepted Islam as his/her religion and prophet Muhammad (pbuh) as the Prophet of Islam. A real Muslim ought to say Shahadatain(2Shahadahs). As well as this, a Muslim ought to perform the orders of Islam. There is a tradition from Prophet Muhammad (Pbuh) that said: The Muslim is a person that other Muslims must be ...


5

A person who just believes in oneness of Allah Muhammad (PBUH) is the last prophet of Allah and all other prophets sent before him the Day of judgment all Angels all Holy Books Is called a believer. In Arabic and in Quran the word Momin is used for them which means/translates to believer. On the other hand, a Muslim is a Momin/believer who observes and ...


5

Beside the well known and among Muslims preferred meanings already explained here "The recitation" or "the continuous recitation" there are others one should know: Of course if we assume that قرآن comes from the verb "قرأ" then it would be a superlative and would mean: intensely read/recited (as reading is also understood in the case of Quran as reciting) -...


5

I believe this refers to intercession (i.e., asking Allah to remove someone from hell); another version of the hadith highlights this: That the Messenger of Allah said: "There are six things with Allah for the martyr. He is forgiven with the first flow of blood (he suffers), he is shown his place in Paradise, he is protected from punishment in the grave, ...


5

The terminology used differs by region. The majority of scholars use the term hadith to describe any such narration that either quotes a speech, describes an action, or documents an approval by either the Prophet ﷺ or any of his companions. When it is a hadith attributed to the Prophet ﷺ, it is called marfū' (Arabic: مرفوع). When it is a hadith attributed ...


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