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I just opened the Quran on my phone and I see after the 'ha' there is an silent Alif or 'Laam'(Not 100% sure). Anyway the ending letter becomes that Alif so reading the 'ha' is correct. In some other ayas there is a silent 'ya' at the end.


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The ج sign after َهُو indicates that this is a position for waqf jaa'iz (permissible pausing/rest) according the tajweed rules of riwayat Hafs 'an' Asim. This means you have the choice to pause (which is marked by a silent diacritics - sukun- in the recitation) or go ahead reciting. So if you toke this opportunity and made a pause you'll recite هُوَ ...


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It seems to me that you are neither an Arabic speaker nor have a basic level in understanding Arabic. As what you suggest would rotate an Arabic linguist in his grave if he could. Let me explain your inquiry with a focus on the linguistic part of the question: Your Example from surat al-Zalzala (99) Al-Zalazala or al-Zalzalah (both actually are examples of ...


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According to the books I looked at, the meaning of صلے is given as an allowed stop but not recommended. This means you can stop if you wish but it is better to continue. Secondly, لا means "don't stop" while قف means "do stop." So it is a bit confusing that both لا and قف are used at the same time in the picture you gave. However, in my opinion, this ...


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When pausing in Arabic, the last letter's vowel can be ignored and be pronounced as a stop. Meaning as if it had a sukoon on it. For example if the phrase is: إِلاَّ هُوَ The هُوَ can be pronounced as as if it was a هُوْ Similarly, if you are pausing at the end of the first ayah in Surah Fatiha, you would pronounce "رَبِّ الْعَالَمِينَ" as if it was "...


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