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The short answer is we have no explanation. From the first hadith in Sahih Muslim, partially quoted below, narrated on the authority of 'Umar ibn al-Khattāb, we know that belief in angels is one of the six articles of imān (faith): قَالَ فَأَخْبِرْنِي عَنِ الإِيمَانِ.‏ قَالَ: أَنْ تُؤْمِنَ بِاللَّهِ وَمَلاَئِكَتِهِ وَكُتُبِهِ وَرُسُلِهِ وَالْيَوْمِ ...


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Chapter 17 of the Qur'an is called Al-Isrā', and Banu Isrā'īl. It was commonly referred to as either by the companions. The chapter is talking mainly about Banu Isrā'īl. It starts with exalting Allah by reminding us of three miracles that He did to demonstrate His power: The night trip of the Prophet ﷺ from night from al-Masjid al-Haram to al-Masjid al-Aqsa....


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Quoting from Soorat al-Isra’ is also called Soorat Bani Isra’eel (read this full link for better understanding and full details.): Soorat al-Isra’ is called Soorat Bani Israa’eel in two saheeh mawqoof hadeeths, in which it is the words of the Sahaabah (may Allah be pleased with them): The first hadeeth was narrated from ‘Abd-Allah ibn Mas‘ood (may Allah be ...


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This is my understanding on this matter: "Masjid" literally refers to "place of prostration" derived from the same root words (س ج د) as Sujud/Sajdah (prostration). A Masjid is any designated place where Muslims gather to pray. It is not defined by any building/structure. Although the building constructions as we know them today may not have existed during ...


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From Tafsir al-Maududi: سُبْحَانَ الَّذِي أَسْرَىٰ بِعَبْدِهِ لَيْلًا مِّنَ الْمَسْجِدِ الْحَرَامِ إِلَى الْمَسْجِدِ الْأَقْصَى الَّذِي بَارَكْنَا حَوْلَهُ لِنُرِيَهُ مِنْ آيَاتِنَا إِنَّهُ هُوَ السَّمِيعُ الْبَصِيرُ Quran 17:1 In this verse, the Qur'an mentions only a part of the Journey, i.e., from Masjid-i-Haram to the Temple at Jerusalem. ...


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