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24

Abdullah (previously Ershad) has explained the Wahhabi movement from the Wahhabi perspective and has mentioned some nice and positive aspects of the Wahhabi movement. Every group believes that they are right, often they believe they are completely right with no mistake in their beliefs. Typically it is almost impossible to find any serious criticism or ...


23

The term "Wahhabi" is nothing but an outcome of ideological attack by made by media and other sects in their efforts to harm the Call to Islamic Monotheism (Tawheed). It is sad to see some people still want to propagate this myth from what they know from hearsay information. And most probably, they even wouldn't know where the term comes from or what the so-...


6

I like to call it the Reset concept. I was watching a video for Hamza Yusuf on the matter awhile ago (forgot which video, will add it later if I find it), and he explains some of the conceptual similarities between Protestants and Salafis. In simple terms, it is the concept of rejecting the tradition, and only accepting the source. Islam, being into ...


5

These are three example verses of the poem that are considered dangerously close to Shirk or even Shirk itself:- O noblest of creation, I have no one but you to turn to except you when major calamity strikes. You don't need to be Salafi to see a problem with this verse. Fatiha itself is enough to tell you that a Muslim only asks for help from Allah:...


4

It has nothing to do with 'groups' or sects. It has to do with the arabic pronounciation. Salah is a perfect example. In Arabic Salah is written like this: صَلَاة. The 'Sa' has a short vowel, and the 'Lah' has the long vowel. So, if it is written in English like 'Salah', it will make it seem that since the same 'a' is used both times, it has the same sound....


4

Do Salafis disapprove of Nowruz? Probably they do. Salafi sources seems to indicate that they consider celebrating Nowruz as haram. IslamQA (the most reputable and popular Salafi website) writes in a Fatawa : The Muslims do not have any festivals which they celebrate except Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. Anything other than that is an innovated ...


4

There is a difference of opinions on whether Al-Badee' (Arabic: البديع) is one of the names of Allah. The name generally means the Originator. The majority of scholars do not consider Al-Badee' to be one of Allah's names, but rather the phrase بَدِيعُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ is considered to be an attribute, based on the verse you quoted: بَدِيعُ ...


3

Anybody can call anyone else an apostate. The real question is, who is taken seriously when that is done? In general, this is the job of a scholar, not the layman. Someone trained in the sciences of the religion to a high level. Scholars are extremely wary of specific assertions of the status of someone's faith, simply because it is almost impossible to ...


3

Your impression of takfīr as a hugely risky process is indeed correct. The Prophet ﷺ warned his companions, and the rest of the Muslim nation, of the risk involved of publicly declaring one as a disbeliever is that one (or both) of them bears the title (either the one declaring or the one being declared against): حَدَّثَنَا أَبُو بَكْرِ بْنُ أَبِي ...


3

Al Wahab didn't introduce/originally derive this concept. He just propagated and 'popularized' it (for lack of a better term). It is a very old concept. In fact, we saw Prophet Abraham (peace be upon him) demonstrating this Islamic principle! There has already been for you an excellent pattern in Abraham and those with him, when they said to their people,...


2

What does madhhab as-Salaf mean? First saying madhhab(u) as-Salaf as -Saalih is suggesting that the early generations of Muslims had a (single) madhhab which is wrong. Secondly madhhab in the context of as-Salaf as-Salih or in general is a term that can be used in at least two different Islamic topics: 'Aqidah (belief) and fiqh (jurisprudence) and ...


2

[Note: The answer is from the mainstream Salafi perspective (cause the OP asked for it)] OP asked: From the Salafi perspective, is the prohibition of depictions of humans and animals retrospective? Yes. According to this IslamQA fatawa (IslamQA is one of the most respected source of mainstream salafi doctrine), it is obligatory to destroy idols. It ...


2

The best example is the shari'a police which for example has more rights than the usual police, as they might even be allowed to punish without presenting people to a court (needs to be checked). This "officers" (called muttawi' مطوع‎‎ are on the beat and for example check whether people have closed or left their offices and shops when prayer is held in a ...


2

Mr. Brown is probably referring to Taqlid here. The general consensus within the traditionalists (Ahl-us-Sunnah) is that the opinion of the knowledgeable scholars (Mujtahid) is superior and maybe accepted by others without knowing (or understanding) the evidence or methods used by those scholars to arrive at that opinion. Sufis also hold the opinion of ...


2

I'm not sure if one could find some references which are better then the fact, that the Sahaba -companions of the Prophet- (May Allah be pleased with them) and later many generations of Muslims lived and have been in what is now known as Egypt, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq etc. and they didn't harm any of those historical monuments which where more or less ...


2

There is no one better equipped to answer this question more than Muhammad ibn 'Abdel-Wahhab, the one Wahhabism is named after. From his book The Three Fundamental Principles (Arabic: الأصول الثلاثة), when discussing the second fundamental principle, he says: الأصل الثاني: معرفة دين الإسلام بالأدلة وهو الاستسلام لله بالتوحيد، والانقياد له بالطاعة، ...


1

This question is hard to answer. Because to answer this question one must really first define wahhabism. Also, is wahhabism just a name for salafism? It seems the tag salafi is used in the question, so maybe you are asking for that. Because there are opinions that salafism is wahhabism, just with different names. If we say they are the same, for the sake ...


1

You stated that "they are different from Sunnis", that's not true at all, Sunnis follow four schools of thought, what people call "Wahhabi" or "Salafi" also follow these four schools of thought. "Wahhabi" is actually a derogatory term for a "Salafi" so let me end its use now. The above being said, if Salafi and Sunni is the same, then why have they been ...


1

بسم الله الرحمن الرحیم Muhammad Husayn Ibrahimi defines Wahhabism in his "A New Analysis of Wahhabi Doctrines" as such: Wahhabism has been labeled with many various names among which is the appellation, ”Salafiyyah”. This name is used because they believe that for the reformation of their religion and beliefs, the present Muslims must go back to ...


1

There is no difference between any of them. As for Wahhabism or Al Wahabiyah, it is attributed to Muhammad bin Abdul Wahhab, this name is not a name that it's followers call rather it is name which was coined by those who were against it. As for the Salafiyah it is a methodology which follows the Salafussalih, and there is no difference with what is known ...


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