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7

I do not know of any established rules, so this is a matter of opinion. I do not think that the opinion of the majority always translates into the opinion being correct, or the opinion that must be followed. Step 1: Check the stance of the scholars For the scholars in disagreement (the minority in this case, since your question is focused on a majority vs. ...


7

Ijma is an Arabic word referring to consensus of the Muslim community. The hadith "My ummah will never agree upon an error" is usually cited for the validity of ijma. There are a number of different opinions on who is part of the ijma, with most views split into two following two possibilities: ijma al-ummah: A consensus by the whole community. ijma al-...


6

Ijmaa and Qiyaas are two technical terms from usool ul-fiqh, or the science of "how do we derive fiqh?" In short, scholars use proofs in the following order (which denotes their strength over lower-level proofs): Qur'an first and foremost Sunnah (hadith) next and practically equal Ijmaa (scholarly consensus) third Qiyaas (analogy to some known issue/ruling) ...


3

There is no one body that is accepted by Muslims anywhere (and this could be more of a blessing than a hindrance). There has been a trend over the past half-century or so to form councils that issue fatawa in response to issues that come up. These councils accept pertinent questions, discuss it among themselves, and finally issue their ruling. Some are well-...


3

Ijma means consensus. Normally it is regarded as "consensus among the all muslims". But some other opinion confined it to "consensus among all ulema". And some other say it is only "consensus among the companions of our prophet". Ijma is itself a source and need not to be derived from Quran and sunnah. In the contrary, Qiyas or analogy is dependent on Quran ...


3

No, attributing a statement to three scholars only does not constitute consensus (ijmā', Arabic: إجماع), or any level of consensus for that matter. However, one has to read the full text of the fatwas to understand their content and context. The first fatwa in Majmū' al-Fatāwa 26/195 (Arabic only) attributes the words to Imam Ibn al-Munādi. Referring to the ...


1

Well the paragraph you mentioned is talking about one of the sources or let me say tools of the sources of the Maliki Madhab: customs and practices of the people of Medina! So i would recommend you to read more about it in wikipedia (there are more details in the Arabic part especially when it comes to the customs and practices of the people of Medina if you ...


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