32

The word "God" does not convey the meaning encompassed by the arabic word "Allah". The origin of the word "Allah" is "Al-Ilaah"[The only one worshipped in Truth]. "Al-Ilaah" and "Allah" are one and the same. In the word "Allah", the hamza was deleted for ease of pronunciation, so "Al-Ilaah" became "Allah". So the meaning the word "Allah" conveys is "The ...


19

The general rules for naming someone with one of Allah's Names are as follows: If the name has a meaning or refers to a function or quality that only Allah is capable of, like creating, resurrecting, lordship, etc. then it is not permissible to call a human being by these names, except by prefixing "'abd" to that name. If however the name refers to a more ...


14

First, finding references on this is hard. Perhaps it's sufficient to say that rasulullah changed the names of certain people when their names were islamically unacceptable. See my answer on naming girls Asiya for some examples. If you look through the sunnah, you won't find that rasulullah changed the names of anyone who had these names; you will find he ...


13

The word "God" in English is quite deficient. For example, you can pluralize it (gods), feminize it (goddess), and so on. In Arabic, the name "Allah" conveys none of that. The form of the name itself implies singularity, which fits in with our beliefs. Also, in Arabic, all words derive from their root verbs; so you can tell something about the meaning ...


7

This is more of strict code of conduct followed by more religious Muslims. They take special care when referring to God because the most fundamental belief in Islam is to believe in one God and that is Allah, not necessarily God. God is a general word which can be used for any God such as they consider the moon as their God, or They worship the sun and ...


7

Good question! There are seven to eight different opinions on the origin of the Divine Name - the lafDh al-Jalalah - الله. Note that this should not be confused with the "meaning" of the word or anything like that. We do not use such a phrase. We will mention 4 of the stronger opinions here: The name is not derived from anything at all. It is simply a ...


6

I think a good example of those allowed names, which ashes999 and Ansari also mentioned is the name Ali. We know that Al-ʿAlī is one of the Allah's names and we also know about Ali ibn Abu Talib (A.S.). As Wikipedia says: Many sources, especially Shia ones, attest that Ali (ibn Abu Talib) was born inside the Kaaba in the city of Mecca, where he stayed ...


5

Rahim is not one of the names of God. Al-Rahim, on the other hand, is. Calling your child's name thus, with the definite article Al-, would be problematic; in such cases you would appropriately go with Abdul-Rahim. Without the definite article, Rahim is just an adjective, and one not unique to God (As Najeeb describes in his own answer, it's used by God ...


5

You are referring to the hadith of the Prophet (Sal allahu 'alayhi wa sallam): “Allaah has ninety-nine names, one hundred less one; whoever memorizes them will enter Paradise.” [Bukhari, Muslim] The word that was translated to "memorize" in Arabic is "أحصى": to enumerate. So the scholars say this reward is not just for memorization, but living by them,...


4

There is more than one correct way of disposing writings which are considered holy. Based on your example, you are using the word 'Allah', this one word would be considered holy, while the rest of the text can be disposed of in any halal manner. To expand, any word or phrase using 'Allah' (Bismillah, Abdullah, etc.) would need to be treated in such a manner. ...


4

A word meaning "god" is distinct from a name of the God. Allah is both. Before Islam, Allah was one of many gods. For example, in the famous sentence لا إله إلا الله, La illaha ila Allah meaning "There is no god but Allah", "god" is spelled "Alif, lam, heh", while Allah is "alif, lam, lam, heh" - it's essentially the same word. See Wikpedia article on this ...


4

"Rahman" means merciful for all (believer or non-believer). Like sending rain, food,... "Rahim" means merciful for believers only. Allah has two kind of mercy. One is for all. And one type is extra only for believers (Mumenin). Source


4

There is a difference of opinions on whether Al-Badee' (Arabic: البديع) is one of the names of Allah. The name generally means the Originator. The majority of scholars do not consider Al-Badee' to be one of Allah's names, but rather the phrase بَدِيعُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ is considered to be an attribute, based on the verse you quoted: بَدِيعُ ...


3

I think you are not right on this, because the word "lord" does not necessarily point to God (Allah) in English. Lord can mean "a man of noble rank or high office" according to the definition that google provides for it. On the other hand "our Lord" or "the Lord" is and has traditionally been the way to address God in Christianity and should not be used for ...


3

اللطيف (Al-Latif, sometimes transcribed as Al-Lathif) is one of the 99 names of Allah, meaning the Subtle, or the Most Kind. Abdullathif (عبد اللطيف) ‎would be a perfectly valid name for a Muslim. I do wonder if your name is just a variation of that (transliterations can make that really hard to tell sometimes), with the double-"L" of Abdullathif ...


3

'Abd, as far as I know, is exclusively masculine; as such, it wouldn't make any sense to use it as a girl's name. The female equivalent would be Amat, which use has dated back to the days of the sahabah (according to the scholars at Islamweb). Grammatically, it connects to the Name of Allah the same as 'Abd would: 'Abdullah (عبد الله: male servant of ...


3

Some aalims (scholars) say: "Rahman" is a name ("Esm") not attribute, just for god. But "Rahim" is an attribute which used for passenger "Mohammad (ص)" in surah "tauba". Two reasons are explained: We can replace "Allah" instead of "Rahman" everywhere in the Quran. "Rahim" used just in kindness of him, but "Rahman" used everywhere. From here.


3

No. Those are pure fabrications most probably based on Jewish mythology. Quran doesn't support that. But thinking about them does benefit you.You should contemplate on them instead. Look 3:191, 4:103. You don't have to learn or memorize them in Arabic. You should learn their meanings instead. Look 17:110. Think about them in the context of surahs and try to ...


3

Yahweh isn't mentioned exactly in the Quran or Hadith, and so using this name in this form isn't recommended since we can't be sure if its an innovation or really from God. The Jews themselves exercise caution and prefer to not use the tetragrammaton because of its sanctity and the prohibition of taking God's name in vain. They have used the name Eloah, ...


2

You can always use God liter instead of Allah liter while you mean the only god, who created all thing we understand and all thing we can not imagine, indeed God's name is sacred in any language and you must ablute (wodhu) before touching to a written God's name. Beside that Allah is a special liter that have clear meaning. We also refer to that Jalale ...


2

Allah (SWT) has thousands of names and 1000 of them are mentioned in Dua Jowshan Kabir; (you may can find that dua here) The 99 names are the Husna names according to this verse of Quran: وَ لِلّهِ الأَسْماءُ الْحُسْنى فَادْعُوهُ بِها and for Allah is the Good names so ask God with those names. And there are many Hadith from prophet and Ahl Bayt ...


2

There is a list of supposed names of Allah in the Haidth, but this list is inauthentic and hence should not be listened to. The scholars who reject this list (in the hadith) as inauthentic are, at-Tirmidhi, al-Baihaqi, ibn Hazm, al-Dawudi, ibn Taymiya, ibn Katheer, ibn Hajr, al-Juwaini, ibn Baz, al-Albani, ibn Uthaimin and Abdul Qadir al-Arnaut. ...


2

I totally agree with Azam's answer who wrote answer in the comment. The Arabic word 'Ya' means 'O'. This word is used to call a person. For Example: "Ya Hamza" means "O Hamza". Another word 'Al', 'Ar' and 'As' etc means 'The'. This word is used for a specific person. For Example: The teacher teaches a book. In this example: The describes a teacher specific. ...


2

I don't think there's anything wrong in calling a human Rahim or even Rauf since the Messenger (SAWS) himself has been referred to as such in the Qur'an: "There has certainly come to you a Messenger from among yourselves. Grievous to him is what you suffer; [he is] concerned over you and to the believers is kind [Rauf] and merciful [Rahim]." [Qur'an 9:128] ...


2

It is not permissible for a Muslim to call Allah by any other name or names except for those which have been stated in the QURAN and Hadith. To simply take a note of this fact see what Allah ta'ala has revealed in this verse. هُوَ اللَّهُ الْخَالِقُ الْبَارِئُ الْمُصَوِّرُ لَهُ الْأَسْمَاءُ الْحُسْنَى يُسَبِّحُ لَهُ مَا فِي السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ ...


2

יְהוָ֔ה in Hebrew means the numbers 10 5 6 10 or letters. وَإِلَـهُكُمْ إِلَهٌ وَاحِدٌ لاَّ إِلَهَ إِلاَّ هُوَ الرَّحْمَنُ الرَّحِيمُ in this verse from Quran we have هُوَ which refers to Allah the first letter and second letter means 5 and 6 accordingly, which is interesting fact. Probably interesting facts can be found. This page can explain more and the ...


2

I think this answer isn't more than an attempt to answer and my answer unfortunately don't include English literature sources (but I tried to add links to an Arabic dictionary to some of the key-words): Definition: Of the two names of Mercy (ar-Rahman and ar-Raheem) (MY OWN TRANSLATION TAKE IT CAREFULLY) الرحمن/ الرحيم: The names ar-rahman (the ...


2

Akbar (اكبر) is an attribute to Allah. It is not a noun.


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