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This is partial answer just addressing the first part of your question. I am aware that the prophets may not be depicted in art work This is the mainstream tradition of Islam; there is no direct Surat in the Qu'ran that supports this - that is mentions both image and prophet; however there is one that solely mentions image: And the people of Moses made ...


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I think this is matter based on different opinions. Some may say statues were haram at a time where the Muslims were close to kufr (at the time of the Prophet etc.) and as those statues are not meant for worship they are somewhat halal or makroh. Because people who were former pagans may easier have a fall back, while people who grow up in a monotheistic ...


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[Note: The answer is from the mainstream Salafi perspective (cause the OP asked for it)] OP asked: From the Salafi perspective, is the prohibition of depictions of humans and animals retrospective? Yes. According to this IslamQA fatawa (IslamQA is one of the most respected source of mainstream salafi doctrine), it is obligatory to destroy idols. It ...


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It is not Haram because prophet (PBUH)didn't forbade us to draw non living things. Allah knows the best


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No. He did not pursue artistic pursuits. He had a nation to lead and he was more preoccupied with guiding people or worship of God. However, he did use literary devices such as vivid analogies and visual displays such as drawing in the sand to teach.. in other words, for productive and educational reasons. Bukhari (6417): The Prophet (ﷺ) drew a square and ...


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Figurative Representation or drawing living/animate things is haram in Islam, despite what has been done previously in history by Muslims (Ottoman and Persian paintings), or what is currently being done, the ruling stands. << Every painter will go to Hell, and for every portrait he has made, there will be appointed one who will chastise him in the ...


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