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5

Well in that case the imam on the radio is rather selfish. اللهم أجرنا من النار. Allahuma ajirna Mina (a)n-Naar means something like Allah save us from the hellfire. And it is correct to say "ameen " as he includes himself and all those listening to his/this du'a. So this formulation is correct for a person making du'a for himself and others like an ...


3

You see, the problem here is that the Arabic language has changed. Which can be said for pretty much any other language that has been in use for over fourteen centuries. Arabic, as it is commonly spoken and understood around the world, really has little in common with the Arabic spoken during the time of the Prophet and encoded in the Qur'an. Heck, even the ...


2

Without the "Abd" (meaning "servant of") and "al" (meaning "the" making it unique to Allah), it may be considered Makruh to name someone "Barr." This is because there is a hadith of the Prophet (SAW): Muhammad b. 'Amr b. 'Ata' reported: I had given the name Barra to my daughter. Zainab, daughter of Abu ...


2

All the beautiful names of Allah have a definite article prior to them: Ar-Rahman الرحمان or الرحمن (The -most- gracious) not رحمن nor رحمان Ar-Rahim الرحيم (The -most- merciful) Al-Qayyum القيوم (The eternal) Al-Wahid الواحد (The one) etc. Without this definite article it doesn't fulfill the condition of uniqueness which is necessary to be related to ...


2

For the sake of this answer, I will translate انزل as "to send." The word "الي" means "to," and it implies something reaching something else. The word "علي" means "upon," and it implies something coming down from above. So, the two were used in different places to accomplish both meanings. Revelations both ...


2

I just opened the Quran on my phone and I see after the 'ha' there is an silent Alif or 'Laam'(Not 100% sure). Anyway the ending letter becomes that Alif so reading the 'ha' is correct. In some other ayas there is a silent 'ya' at the end.


2

Are there clear rules about how such words in the Quran should be pronounced based purely on reading it? Yes, such rules do exist. Many editions of the Mushaf usually include a section at the end which contains a summary of those rules with examples for each one. You can find that section in this Mushaf, for example. Here are some screenshots from it: or ...


2

There are two pieces of evidence I found as to why the words Ar-Rahman and Ar-Raheem are interpreted the way you mentioned. The first is the word etymology itself, and the second is the linguistic use of both words. Both Ar-Rahman and Ar-Raheem mean the one who has a lot of mercy. Ar-Rahman comes in the pattern of "فَعْلَان" and this pattern is ...


2

How do we distinguish verb tenses in Quran? This can be done similarly as you would distinguish verb tenses outside the qur'an in any other language: this requires knowledge about the language itself, its grammar, its conjugation beside a good vocabulary and understanding (by practicing etc.) the language. Here the verb is: عاد which means to return. Note ...


1

The Masahif of Uthman (RA) did have differences between them. Those differences were limited to the addition or subtraction of one or two letters. I haven't found differences of more than that. The difference you mention of 9:100 is a difference in the addition or subtraction of "من" which is only two letters. The Mushaf of Makkah had a من while ...


1

I somewhat disagree with the answer given ln by @goldpseudo. The Arabic language - restricted on the words of the qur'an- has not changed. But similarly as the restriction made by 'Othman ibn' Affan in his compilation of the qur'an by favoring the language of Quraish. The - in use- language has restricted certain meanings. And mainly killed the diversity of ...


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It seems to me that you are neither an Arabic speaker nor have a basic level in understanding Arabic. As what you suggest would rotate an Arabic linguist in his grave if he could. Let me explain your inquiry with a focus on the linguistic part of the question: Your Example from surat al-Zalzala (99) Al-Zalazala or al-Zalzalah (both actually are examples of ...


1

Ar-Rahman is the Entirely Merciful whose “All-inclusive mercy gives to both the worthy and unworthy. The mercy of God is perfect and all-inclusive. It is perfect in the sense that He not only wills the satisfaction of the needs of the needy but actually satisfies them. It is all-inclusive in that it includes the worthy and the unworthy, this life and that ...


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No (not every word like this is feminine) and No (the word Allah is neither feminine nor masculine). The letter "ت" or "ة" is an indication for female names, but not exclusively Not all words that end with the letter "ت" or "ة" refer to a feminine word in Arabic, not even if this word is a "noun" for example: If we call a person genius we say Nabighah to ...


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