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I am 22 years old. I always try to behave in Islamic ways. My father is a believer in Islam, but he doesn't pray regularly. He also does not fast during holy Ramadhan. Can I force him to do those?

Also, does Islam allow one to force anyone to stick to all the rules of Islam?

  • +1: The whole point of this life the possibility to do good and do bad, upon which we will be judged. – user2350 Jul 13 '13 at 20:33
  • Force in what sense? Physical confrontation? For some muslims, saying Prophet (salallahu alayhi wassalam) said so or forbade it etc. would be a force enough to create fear of Allah. I think the question needs to be more explicit. – Abdullah Jul 29 '13 at 5:25
  • By the way, fasting in Ramadan is not required if you are physically unable (like say, you are a diabetic) or if you are traveling - in these cases you can make up your fast later or give charity. See 2:184. – Burhan Khalid Aug 27 '14 at 6:31
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Islam is a Deen (religion) to which you need to submit and surrender to the will of Allah. It’s only then you are a Muslim. Allah says the only reason for our creation is to worship him. But there is no compulsion in Religion but the Muslim has been commanded to bring people to the good and forbid the evil.

If you get all of this you should make the best effort in the most beautiful manner as our Rasool Allah swas use to do. Along with this you should do dua to Allah to give Hidayat (guidance or conduction) and make it easy for your father to follow the Deen.

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4.135 O You who believe! stand out firmly for justice, as witnesses to Allah, even as against yourselves, or your parents, or your kin, and whether it be (against) rich or poor: for Allah can best protect both. Follow not the lusts (of your hearts), lest You swerve, and if You distort (justice) or decline to do justice, verily Allah is well-acquainted with all that You do.

5.8 O ye who believe! stand out firmly for Allah, as witnesses to fair dealing, and let not the hatred of others to you make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. Be just: that is next to piety: and fear Allah. For Allah is well-acquainted with all that ye do.

Islam does command us to enjoin good and prohibit bad but the use of the word 'force' sounds off putting . I don't understand how it is even possible to force someone to do things and when it comes to Islam then what is the use of 'forcing' a person who does not believe , but if he is a believer in Islam , just a little lazy to not follow things or innovate new things in religion then we do have examples of Sahabas who did strongly voiced their opposition and were very strict with regards to fundamental aspects of Islam.

I roughly remember about narrations which report that the Sahabas and prophet pbuh would boycott the person who refrained from coming to Jihad. Also there are some authentic reports of Hazrat Umar RA ordering lashes to his own son for drinking Alcohol which lead to his death.

But in your case you are a subordinate to your parents and hence need to respect your parents and pray for their guidance , forcing them to pray can also have bad effects on you and your fathers perception towards Islam.

  • ok, i should not force him but how i approach him? And what about if any parents force their child to maintain Islamic rules. – Moshii Jul 15 '13 at 12:30
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    @Moshii you can ask another superior elders who is having good relations with your father to explain this. You may also invite local dawah speakers to your home or create your own Islamic environment in home by reading out books like Riyadhus Saliheen in a seating – Islam Jul 15 '13 at 13:04
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It's all up to us. We just need to be just, kind, and have a good heart. We cannot and should never be able to force a non-Muslim to accept Islam, nor a Muslim to quit Islam. It would be intrusive and annoying. Only God can know best, and there's the reason why it's being said.

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No, you cannot. There's no enforcement in Islam. Because Quran explicitly states that:

لَا إِكْرَ‌اهَ فِي الدِّينِ ۖ قَد تَّبَيَّنَ الرُّ‌شْدُ مِنَ الْغَيِّ ۚ فَمَن يَكْفُرْ‌ بِالطَّاغُوتِ وَيُؤْمِن بِاللَّـهِ فَقَدِ اسْتَمْسَكَ بِالْعُرْ‌وَةِ الْوُثْقَىٰ لَا انفِصَامَ لَهَا ۗ وَاللَّـهُ سَمِيعٌ عَلِيمٌ

There is no compulsion in religion. Verily, the Right Path has become distinct from the wrong path. Whoever disbelieves in Taghut and believes in Allah, then he has grasped the most trustworthy handhold that will never break. And Allah is All-Hearer, All-Knower.

[Al-Baqarah: 256]

However, if you think it would be effective, you should enjoin what is good and forbid what is wrong as this verse of Quran (and some others) approve:

ادْعُ إِلَىٰ سَبِيلِ رَبِّكَ بِالْحِكْمَةِ وَالْمَوْعِظَةِ الْحَسَنَةِ ۖ وَجَادِلْهُم بِالَّتِي هِيَ أَحْسَنُ ۚ إِنَّ رَبَّكَ هُوَ أَعْلَمُ بِمَن ضَلَّ عَن سَبِيلِهِ ۖ وَهُوَ أَعْلَمُ بِالْمُهْتَدِينَ

Invite to the way of your Lord with wisdom and good instruction, and argue with them in a way that is best. Indeed, your Lord is most knowing of who has strayed from His way, and He is most knowing of who is [rightly] guided.

[An-Nahl: 125]

Enjoining what is good and forbidding what is wrong is an important topic in Islam, but it has some preconditions to become Fard for muslims. If you don't know enough about this topic you may want to ask another question.

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    the OP ask about fiqh, your answer about believe, since his father is 'formerly' Muslim, your answer are off topic. – Ahmad Azwar Anas Jul 14 '13 at 3:59
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    @AhmadAzwarAnas , Do you mean he must force his father about fiqh cause his father is a muslim? I don't think so. The verse 2:256 doesn't refer to belief. It speaks about the religion entirely. – Zahra Ezati Jul 14 '13 at 12:40
  • No.. ^^. I just disagree with your verses that you entered. I think you wrong in inserting verses that related with OP question. I agree that we not allowed to force. – Ahmad Azwar Anas Jul 15 '13 at 2:33

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