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I keep hearing a lot of this word and am interested to know who and when one is referred to as kafir?

How he is treated by Islam?

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I thank you for your curiosity about this.

Kafir is a subject based on the verb Kuf'r. One who commits Kuf’r is Kafir. Kuf’r in Arabic dictionary bears three meanings.

  • To conceal,
  • To be ungrateful
  • To deny or to reject.

Anyone who rejects to believe in Allah is a kafir. Kuf'r is considered as an unforgivable sin, however, Allah may forgive every sin if one promises to never do that sin again and apologise sincerely.

The answer and explanation of this question is vast. You can read the explanations on these links:

Who is a Kafir?

Wikipedia: Kafir

Regarding 'Kafir' and 'Kufr'

A little off-topic suggestion: I noticed you are an indian. You may watch Dr. Zakir Naik's lecture about "Concept of God in Islam and Hinduism" and "Similarities between hinduism and islam". You will find out a lot of similarities. ----------Happy reading :)

  • zakir's speeches are controversial (100% for non-muslim), and like many I believe are biased, baseless or misinterpreted – GodWithin Mar 13 '13 at 4:56
  • Kuf'r is considered as an unforgivable sin Kufr is a sin which is not forgiven, not considered. Kufr is not a forgiveable sin. – TheBlackBenzKid Mar 16 '13 at 21:27
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The word Kaafir (Kafir) is Arabic. It means Disbeliever. The plural is Kufaar; means many Disbelievers. Anyone who does not believe in the Shahada is considered a Kaafir. The Shahada is the declaration that a person believes There is no God but Allah and Muhammad (Peace be upon Him) is His slave and Messenger.

They are treated (with regards to the Islamic state which currently does not exist) with mostly the same rights as Muslims providing the pay the Jizia (tax). There is no compulsion in religion. Even the Kaafir; athiest should be treated justly so maybe one day, they too, God Willing will accept the Truth, that is Islam.

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