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For sunni's the reign of 'Umar ibn 'Abdal'aziz is considered as a time of Justice. And he is wdely considerd as the fifth of the rashidi caliphs. I've heard that he made a statement (the verification of which might make a good question here) saying:

If poverty was an (human) enemy I would fight it.

He made many reforms especially fighting former inequity in the taxation system of the Omayyad. For example it is said that the berbers suffered a lot from taxation and other rulings the Omayyads enforced on them (which partly where unislamic) until he came and lifted them from them.
For the above and many other reasons he is considered as the -agreed upon- mujadid (at the end) of the first century.

My question is what do shi'a sources tell about this man? I've lately heard somebody saying that this is a man on which there's consensus among Muslims and I wanted to clarify whether this statement is correct. So please add relevant sources and evidences for your claims.

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This WikiShia entry summarizes the Shia view of him but the translation of one or two words in it is a little inaccurate. You can also check the Arabic version.

In sum, his services are recognized but he is still seen as an occupier of a position that belonged to the Infallible. Imam Baqir (AS), the fifth Shia Imam, who was contemporary to Ibn Abd al-Aziz, had preached and advised him on some occasions. More importantly he is quoted in al-Khara'ij wa-l-Jara'ih of Qutb ad-Dyn ar-Ruwandi (a shi'a scholar of the 6th century and student of sheikh at-Tusi) predicting his rule and justice until he dies and "people will weep over his death but angels in the heaven will curse him" and then explaining that it would be because despite his justice, he would be occupying the position that belonged to the Imams of Ahl al-Bayt. To elaborate this point, for the Shia, no example of justice and virtue can even get near to the level of the Infallible Imams as they were supported by angels, had full knowledge of the religion and its batin to excel over the best examples of mankind.

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    The source of imam al-Baqir's statement is "الخرائج والجرائح" (al-Kharaij wa-l-Jaraih) from Qutb ad-Dyn ar-Ruwandi a shi'a scholar of the 6th century and student of sheikh at-Tusi. – Medi1Saif Jan 16 at 8:38

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