9

I came accross Sana'a publication by Sadeghi (Sana'a and The Origins of Qur'an), but he only conclude some example of textual variation with standard qur'an.

Table 1 gives a few examples, in English translation, in which C-1 differs from the standard text.38 The C-1 type shares a number of variants enter image description here

He also, pointed many reading variants from Ibn Mas'ud and Ubay ibn Ka'ab. Which is not what I, or every layman, can understand. (Is it affect the meaning?)

enter image description here

Have also searched this forum and found this interesting insight,

Is it likely that the sana'a manuscript was an accepted reading of the Quran?

Adding up some more point in textual variant.

But still, it's not complete list. I was wondering if any publication has been made, which include list of all difference found between Sana'a and the current Qur'an; in terms of overall meaning in english translation?

Because I didn't find one.

3
  • None of the works related to the differences between the qur'an and the sana'a manuscript point at a difference in the meaning. They point only at differences in the wording (addition or subtraction of words or letters). In fact the scattered papers more likely look like different manuscripts as they are written at least in two different styles.
    – Medi1Saif
    Feb 22, 2019 at 7:50
  • 1
    @Medi1Saif I am unsure why no one put the effort, as this "adding or substraction of words or letter" is crucial part for every layman, moreover with arabic incapabilities, to grasp wether quranic verse does really changed in the meaning; or not? even if Sadeghi put the note "it's not changed in overall". Still, this statement were only based on his own research. Feb 22, 2019 at 9:53
  • Perhaps you should research the different qiraat. In short, in terms of the qiraat, the meanings can be different, but that doesn't mean it is contradictory. For example, 1:3 Maliki (king) vs. Maaliki (owner). They're not the same in meaning, but neither are they contradictory. That is why I don't think you should be that concerned about some meaning changes even if they exist in the Sana'a manuscript. Maybe they are from lost Quranic recitations. In addition, scribal errors are also a thing. It would be possible and even likely for unofficial copies of the mushaf to have mistakes in it.
    – The Z
    Jul 15, 2020 at 3:43

3 Answers 3

0

The Sana'a manuscript is one of the oldest known copies of the Quran, dating back to the early 8th century. The manuscript contains some differences and variations in the text compared to the standard Uthmanic text of the Quran that is commonly used today. However, it is important to note that these differences are minor and do not affect the fundamental beliefs and teachings of the Quran.

While there are some scholars who have studied the differences between the Sana'a manuscript and the standard Uthmanic text, there is no complete list of differences that can be considered authoritative or comprehensive. This is because the Sana'a manuscript is not a standardized text, and there are variations in the text between different pages and sections of the manuscript.

In general, the differences between the Sana'a manuscript and the Uthmanic text are primarily related to spelling and grammar, rather than meaning. For example, there may be differences in the placement of diacritical marks, the use of certain letters, or the arrangement of words and phrases. However, these differences do not affect the overall message and teachings of the Quran.

It is worth noting that the Quran has been transmitted orally and in writing through various channels since the time of Prophet Muhammad, and there have been minor variations in the text over time. However, Islamic scholars have developed a rigorous system of textual criticism and verification to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of the Quranic text.

In conclusion, while there are some minor differences between the Sana'a manuscript and the standard Uthmanic text of the Quran, these differences do not affect the fundamental beliefs and teachings of the Quran. Islamic scholars have developed a rigorous system of textual criticism and verification to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of the Quranic text, and the differences between the Sana'a manuscript and the standard Uthmanic text are considered minor and inconsequential.

1
  • This does not answer the question Jan 14 at 3:05
0

The Sana'a Manuscripts are a collection of early Quranic manuscripts discovered in Sana'a, Yemen. These manuscripts date back to the 7th and 8th centuries and provide valuable insights into the early development of the Quran. However, it is important to note that the Sana'a Manuscripts do not differ significantly from the current Quran in terms of meaning.

The Quran has been preserved in its original form since its revelation to the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). The Sana'a Manuscripts primarily contain variations in spelling, diacritical marks, and minor grammatical differences. These variations do not alter the overall meaning or message of the Quran.

It is worth mentioning that the preservation of the Quran is a divine promise from Allah, as mentioned in Surah Al-Hijr (15:9): "Indeed, it is We who sent down the Qur'an and indeed, We will be its guardian."

Therefore, while the Sana'a Manuscripts provide valuable historical and linguistic insights, they do not present any significant differences in meaning from the current Quran that Muslims recite and follow today.

-2

The Sana'a Manuscripts are a collection of early Quranic manuscripts discovered in Sana'a, Yemen. These manuscripts are considered to be among the oldest surviving copies of the Quran. While there are some minor variations in the text, it is important to note that these differences do not affect the overall meaning or message of the Quran. The Quran has been preserved in its original form, as it was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), without any changes in its meaning. The variations in the Sana'a Manuscripts are primarily related to spelling and diacritical marks, which do not alter the core teachings of Islam. It is worth mentioning that the primary source for understanding the Quran is the standardized text that has been transmitted through generations of scholars and memorizers, and it is this standardized text that is widely accepted and recited by Muslims worldwide.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .