4

In Islam a lot of thing are strictly time based like. For example

  • Ramadan starts from this day in the evening to this day in the evening. The reward for prayers is more in Ramadan.

  • Laylat al-Qadr (Lailatul Qadr/Shab-e-Qadr) happens on a particular moment in the last 10 days of Ramadan (in the middle of the night).

  • Prayers are taken at particular time because they are accepted only if done on time,

case: 1

Lets talk about Laylat al-Qadr (where one night is equal to 1000 years according to the holy quran). If am in Saudi arabia and lets say I experience the Laylat al-Qadr, it will be day light in parts of United States. Does that means Laila-al-Qadr is not a universal event but rather revolves around the Earth as Earth rotates.

case: 2

Also about Ramadan. If if starts in Saudi Arabia and it hasn't started in England till the next day, that will mean a Muslim who pray in Saudi Arabia will be rewarded more then the Muslim who pray in England. Because in one place it is Ramadan, in other it is a regular day.

So my question is how do we interpret time in Islam? Is it unique event that happens in Islam or it happens over an interval in time which could be as long as many days?

  • ramazan is a month in the islamic calender (like january, february etc) not a day so your 1st point needs correction. – Ashu Jun 23 '12 at 12:37
  • @Ashu, I am taking days into account rather the month. Yes it s month but it start from a day and end on another day, sometime 29,30 or 31. – muslim1 Jun 23 '12 at 12:47
3

Deeds are rewarded according to your situation and your intention. For example, a woman in her menses can't pray, but a man must pray in that time period. Each act of worship comes with conditions (shuroot) and pillars (arkan) (and wajibaat and sunan etc.). Those conditions apply to each individual and his/her circumstances.

So for example, if the crescent of Ramadan was sighted in the East and it's still daytime for the West, then Ramadan has only begun for the one who has sighted the crescent and the sun has set (this is a condition).

Same with lailat al-qadr - one of the conditions for lailat al-qadr is that it be night! And yes, lailat al-qadr revolves around the world as the night moves. Allah SWT knows best where and when and how it begins and ends, but individually it doesn't really matter because the individual experiences it as one night (unless said individual is trying some funky around-the-world flying that particular day).

1

in Islam the time is considered local and there is no need to be global. if now is Laila-la-Qadir for me it can be Laila-la-Qadir for you 10 hours later and there is no problem. is there any problem.

also when it is said one night is blessed its day is also included. and it is not exactly at night hours.

  • This would mean if my cousin in Saudi arabia witness Laila-al-Qadr, he can call me and I can prepare for it on the same night in US? Also how do we know local time is considered, not global. – muslim1 Jun 23 '12 at 12:48
  • @Thecrocodilehunter you can prepare but your Laila-al-Qadr is by your own local time and not by local time of your cousin. your cousin has his own local Laila-al-Qadr. I said this according to some Hadith I have read in past but now I can not tell the exact reference. also it is clear according to prayer times that time is considered local. each Muslim should pray according to his own local time and there is no global time for daily prayers. – Battle of Karbala Jun 23 '12 at 12:55
  • @Ahmadi, then if I can travel follow of sun, then every night (keeped one night) will be Laila-al-Qadr for me?! – Yasser Zamani Jun 23 '12 at 14:31
  • @YasserZamani Laila-al-Qadr is only one night. in this case you will have a 24 hour night. when earth turn one time the Laila-al-Qadr will finish for every local point. also without this travel the day of Laila-al-Qadr has same value and reward of its night. in fact Laila-al-Qadr is 24 hour and not only one night. Hadith says the day of Laila-al-Qadr has same value and reward. – Battle of Karbala Jun 23 '12 at 15:59

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