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So i was reading up on shirk from this website http://www.shaadhamid.com/2014/11/shirk-forms-shirk/ and it got me thinking

"If obeying someone else means that you’re going to disobey Allah, then it is shirk. I’ll say that again: if you have to obey someone else. But obeying that someone else means that you disobey Allah, then it is shirk. I’ll give you an example: You’re supposed to pray. Whose command is that? Allah’s. Your dad says “don’t pray” or he says “pray later… pray in an hour”. Now you have a conflict of obedience to parent or obedience to Allah. "

The main point being

Your dad says “don’t pray” or he says “pray later… pray in an hour”. Now you have a conflict of obedience to parent or obedience to Allah. "

Lets say if i ask my dad if his ready to pray, and he tells me sure just give me half an hour or let me finish this off and we can pray together. is waiting for him to be ready then a form of Shirk? Super confused.

In that case, waiting for anyone ever to be ready in regards to prayer would be shirk? Would it be Greater Shirk or Minor Shirk?

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Short answer, no. Waiting for your father to come pray with you is not an act of Shirk.

Long answer, Shirk is associating others with Allah. For example, if you start to believe that your father has the power/authority to dictate when a prayer should or shouldn't happen, then yes you're associating others with Allah. If you start believing that waiting for your father to come pray with you -because he says so- is a divine obligation then yes, that could fall under Shirk.

In conclusion, delaying your prayer because of whatever reason isn't an act of Shirk, unless it includes a faulty belief where you think that those reasons have divine authority in delaying your prayer. I hope that makes sense. And Allah (SWT) knows best.

  • "If you start believing that waiting for your father to come pray with you -because he says so- is a religious obligation then yes, that could fall under Shirk." - could you explain more what you mean here? This seems to be a matter where the son misunderstand fiqh, which in cases like this has nothing to do with shirk. – Kilise Sep 28 '17 at 5:58
  • @Kilise If he starts to believe that his father can call the shots (from a religiously authoritative standpoint), then obviously such belief would compromise his Tawheed. The difference between waiting for someone because you want to or out of respect vs. waiting for someone because you believe they have a divine authority in delaying your prayer. – Shadi Sep 28 '17 at 10:49

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