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I want to consider a few of the uncountably many thoughts/common conceptions one might list here:

  • more than 18,000 terror attacks in the last decade were claimed on behalf of Islam. There have been more than 30 thousand attacks since 9/11.

  • Muslims refer to non-muslims with a pejorative term, Kafir, and subject non-muslims to a religion tax. No other mainstream religion employs a similar practice.

  • Is it not true that part of mandatory prayers is asking for your god to make non-Muslims suffer?

  • Muslims have created the most apartheid place on earth - Mecca. It openly bans non-Muslims. What if we operationalized such logic across religions and locations? The world would devolve.

  • Islam includes a directive to kill any former believer who tries to separate himself or herself from Islam.

  • Islam is the only religion that systemically forms the basis of theocratic governments. And most of these theocracies are backward along the dimensions of human rights, cruelty to others, etc.

  • In keeping with the above point, Shari'a law is backward relative to developed systems of law. For example, it allows for child marriage. In fact, UNICEF in 2011 publicly states its position as, roughly, that Shari'a law provisions are discriminatory against women from a human rights perspective. In legal proceedings under Shari'a law, a woman’s testimony is worth half of a man’s before a court.

  • Jihad. Just. Wow. It is the directive of Islam that believers, whether using covert or overt methods, spread Islam until it covers the world. Islam and its proponents destroy cultures, museums, art, history whenever it is considered jahiliyya.

  • Though this is perhaps more cultural and less a function of Islam, it seems that Islam is the common denominator here and so I must at least consider it: it seems like immigrants from Muslim countries to the developed world refuse to assimilate, force their religion upon others, demand that others make accommodations on behalf of Islam that are not made for any other religion or practice, perpetuate violence, degrade women etc. I understand that this is not ubiquitous. I am saying that evidence indicates that believers of Islam, proportionally, do these things more relative to immigrants of other religions. And I am curious if, for example, Muslims have a superiority complex that drives such actions.

I am not appealing to the ancient history of Islam for the basis of my question. This is unfair because other religions have perpetrated mass violence in the past. Christians murdered people in witch hunts and launched the crusades (though one may question the nexus of these wars and perhaps split blame). Catholics ruined South America and destroyed entire cultures. I am not defending or promoting any other religion.

What I am doing is trying to understand whether or not I am subject to some misperception. It seems to me that Islam is dangerous for anyone who chooses not to believe in Islam, for people who are not men, and even for Muslims who eventually become unsure in faith.


I am interested in genuine answers from people who practice this faith. This is not an attack. This is not an invitation to engage in vitriol. This is curiosity.

I was unsure of what tag to use and so I picked a tag at random. My apologies.


some sources I used to try and understand Islam and that shaped the above list:

http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/attacks/attacks.aspx?Yr=2017

https://www.islamreligion.com/

http://researchguides.library.vanderbilt.edu/islam/islamlinks

  • I have also spent much time study debates between prominent anti-theists, like Chris Hitchens or Sam Harris, and Islamic scholars.

Harris' site: https://www.samharris.org/books/islam-and-the-future-of-tolerance

I enjoy discourse between these two: http://www.economist.com/blogs/erasmus/2015/10/muslim-atheist-debate

It is also through Sam Harris that I learned of Reza Aslan.

I know this is a bit informal. I changed my wording to be more fair (in response to comment below) since I haven't the time to formally site everything within.

  • 1
    Could you provide references for each "fact"? – Kilise Apr 2 '17 at 14:40
  • This is fair. Let me change words so that I am more precise. – 123 Apr 2 '17 at 14:44
  • Down voting this instead of addressing it gives me the impression that a person is more willing to be petty than to defend his or her religion fairly. I have asked questions here because it is a community of experts. If I can not seek fair answers here then where can I seek them? Where else should I turn for accurate information? – 123 Apr 2 '17 at 14:51
  • 3
    Your question is actually too broad. Many of these questions already exist in this site, yet most of them are primarily opinion-based and some even off-topic. – Kilise Apr 2 '17 at 15:18
  • 3
    Your question is too broad, please ask a single, precise and concise question per thread on islam.SE, after using the search feature to read up on similar existing questions that have already been answered. Currently each of your bullet points is a seperate question in itself (some of which have been answered beforehand), and the top and bottom ones are off-topic because they are about political behavior rather than religious teachings. Your title question is an opinion based discussion rather than a factual question that can be answered. – UmH Apr 2 '17 at 15:40
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As I stated in the comments, this question is too broad, contains questions with lots of different of opinions and son on.

I'll try to link each question to an answer, or adding some comments:

more than 18,000 terror attacks in the last decade were claimed on behalf of Islam. There have been more than 30 thousand attacks since 9/11.

You find your answer here: "Why is Islam linked to terrorism and violence by global media?", maybe here too.


Muslims refer to non-muslims with a pejorative term, Kafir, and subject non-muslims to a religion tax. No other mainstream religion employs a similar practice.

This is actually two questions:

Muslims refer to non-muslims with a pejorative term, Kafir

And:

and subject non-muslims to a religion tax. No other mainstream religion employs a similar practice.

Now, there are different of opinions what a non-muslim should be called. Mostly kafir is used as a term to describe non-muslims, while others argue that not every non-muslim can be described as a kafir. See here: "What is the definition of a kaffir" or here: "Will Jews go to Janna (Paradise)?"

And here is a question/answer about the tax known as "jizya".


Is it not true that part of mandatory prayers is asking for your god to make non-Muslims suffer?

False. Never heard about this before. This might be relevant. Also There is a difference between Salat (mandatory prayers) and Dua (supplication).


Muslims have created the most apartheid place on earth - Mecca. It openly bans non-Muslims. What if we operationalized such logic across religions and locations? The world would devolve.

This question is relevant: "Are non-muslims allowed to visit Mecca?" As you might noticed, it is closed as primarily opinion-based. You will notice two answers, one which says no and one which says yes.


Islam includes a directive to kill any former believer who tries to separate himself or herself from Islam.

This is opinion based. You may find this question relevant: "Is punishment for leaving Islam death?". Mostly the people tending to lean to the nowday salafi interpretation of Islam do say that a penalty should be given to the one leaving islam in certain conditions. Here is a video in Arabic which is translated into English which actually is against death penalty, "Is death penalty for apostasy Islamic? - Adnan Ibrahim"


Islam is the only religion that systemically forms the basis of theocratic governments. And most of these theocracies are backward along the dimensions of human rights, cruelty to others, etc.

I think this has much to do with politics and culture, asking a separate question about this would be best, but I think it actually is a broad question with lots of opinions.


In keeping with the above point, Shari'a law is backward relative to developed systems of law. For example, it allows for child marriage. In fact, UNICEF in 2011 publicly states its position as, roughly, that Shari'a law provisions are discriminatory against women from a human rights perspective. In legal proceedings under Shari'a law, a woman’s testimony is worth half of a man’s before a court.

Here we must first define what Sharia law is. Is there a solid definition? Truly Sharia is a subject which there are lots of debate over in the muslim community. It has been debated in the last 1400 years. This is due to the many opinions that exists. See this question; "What is Sharia Law?" A clip by Hamza Yusuf; "Islamic State and Shariah Law are fantasies"


Jihad. Just. Wow. It is the directive of Islam that believers, whether using covert or overt methods, spread Islam until it covers the world. Islam and its proponents destroy cultures, museums, art, history whenever it is considered jahiliyya.

See, "What is the real meaning of Jihad?", "Is jihad an integral part of Islam?".


Though this is perhaps more cultural and less a function of Islam, it seems that Islam is the common denominator here and so I must at least consider it: it seems like immigrants from Muslim countries to the developed world refuse to assimilate, force their religion upon others, demand that others make accommodations on behalf of Islam that are not made for any other religion or practice, perpetuate violence, degrade women etc. I understand that this is not ubiquitous. I am saying that evidence indicates that believers of Islam, proportionally, do these things more relative to immigrants of other religions. And I am curious if, for example, Muslims have a superiority complex that drives such actions.

I live in an European country with the highest immigration rates and most of this isn't true considering the vast majority of people coming to the country: "refuse to assimilate, force their religion upon others". Also as you said, when similar actions do occur, they often are related to culture and other factors that really haven't much support in the religion itself.


Now because this question is really broad, I cannot write a lot on each question, and as you noticed, most of these exist already in Islam SE. Many questions are opinion based and require much study if one wants to get to its depth, analyzing them objectively.

I do recommend you to ask a single question at a time, if you cannot find it in our site.

  • Thanks for the time and effort. I will read through these links etc. as time permits and then, in accordance with the wishes of this community, make each point into a separate question using this response as guidance. Again, thanks very much. – 123 Apr 2 '17 at 22:04

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