1

My actual question is 'How do you react when an Islamic Department or any Islamic organizations decides to change names of few foods that had been existed or known for you for decades?'

Here, the situation is:

Recently an Islamic organizations (a government body) of a country decides to change the name of food because it is related to animal that Haram for the Muslim. The food that I'm talking about is "Hotdog" = a sausage which definitely not made from dog meat, of course. Due to its common name, there is a restaurant that name their brand as 'Bagel Dog' (if not mistaken but there is dog name for the product). The body claimed that 'dog' sounds obscure, vague and it sounds Haram.

Food outlets selling hot dogs in Malaysia have been asked to rename their products or risk being refused halal certification. -- BBC, 2016

However, few people argue about it because they had called the food such name for decades. They criticize and condemned the action of the body. (What make it sad is, it cause war of words between the Muslim in that country, while of course the non-Muslim in that country belittle the action).

But I agree so much if they can change term bacon (that makes from Halal meat) which for me its confusing no matter what, because normally when people said bacon, its from swine.

Doesn't mean if I agree or disagree with the act, if its cause uncertainty, then you have to avoid it, as a Muslim. As an example, if you feel hesitate about the source of the food or the way it is prepared, you have to avoid to eat the food, unless in emergency situation (correct me if wrong).

  • This is just silly and sad, it doesn't matter what food is called, it matters what its made of, otherwise I would be able to label chicken as pork and eat it. – Aboudi Oct 23 '16 at 14:41
0

Naming is important. But that much...I don't think so. It looks like a very conservative approach. It's a universal name. Rarely products have names with bad anti-Muslim intentions...only then it becomes logical to change the name.

Having that said if the name is confusing (I remember when I was a kid I used to think hotdog had something to do with a dog)...to be understood as halal (I don't know of culture in Malaysia) then it becomes a linguistic choice.

From what I understand this isn't the case.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.