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Islam Q&A (article 88206) writes about Muslims eating kosher meat, quoting Shaykh Ibn 'Uthaymeen:

It is not essential to ask about that which was slaughtered by a Muslim or a kitaabi, and how it was slaughtered, and whether the name of Allaah was mentioned over it or not. Rather that should not be done, because that is being obstinate in religious matters. ...

Question: What does not being "obstinate in religious matters" mean in everyday life?

Obviously, there's certain things we should and should not do regardless of whether or not we're being obstinate. The above (eating kosher meat) is one example, and I'm seeking an answer which expands on this with further examples and how to apply it to everyday life. (Perhaps avoiding drinking coke or listening to music would be examples of being obstinate in religious matters.)

At which point do we say enough is enough, and declare that we're in danger of being obstinate?

  • I think what's being admonished as "obstinate" is too much scepticism about whether the conditions of the ruling that kitaabi meat is halal have been met, with the conditions and the ruling being clear; so the point here is not to worry too much about whether the conditions of a ruling have been met if you are reasonably sure that that is the case. "Waswasa" is a related issue, and one of the psychological states subsumed under that heading would be permanent doubtfulness whether you have fulfilled your religious obligations to the point that the doubtfulness becomes debilitating. – G. Bach Oct 2 '16 at 12:23
  • The issue about music is in a quite different camp. While most scholars consider it flat out haram in principle, the conflict between the enjoyableness of music and the strictness of the widely dominant ruling makes people look for loopholes since it makes them incredulous that actually, prohibition is the ruling - so while the ruling is clear, they have incentive to doubt it. The question about coca cola is different again since it is about a lack of clarity what degree of alcohol is haram, so the reason for inquiry here is uncertainty about what the conditions are. – G. Bach Oct 2 '16 at 12:24
  • In first place being obstinate in religious matters doesn't mean practicing something which is haram or leaving something halal. – Medi1Saif Oct 4 '16 at 11:39

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