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What is the difference between sallam and salam?

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What is their structure, construction?

What is difference in meanings?

I used to use and know only one word - salam, but I have seen "salallahu alayhi wa sallam" that means "may Allah honour him and grant him peace" (see https://en.wikipedia.org ). I used the word "salam" as "hello/hi". But both salam and sallam mean "peace" in the salawat. There also is salawat version with "salam": "ʿalayhi as-salām" (see the wikipedia article.)

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Well both salam سَلَام (which is in first place a noun) or sallam سَلّم (which is a verb) have the same root مصدر or origin: سَلَمَ. I will try to explain most possible meanings and link some Qur'an Verses where they are used, hoping this would help to understand the meaning according to the context:

Salam سَلَام or السَّلاَم

  • could have different meanings among them: peace, harmony, freedom...

  • but if it is in the context of greeting: it would be understood as greeting, salutation, salute which all is wishing peace.

  • If it's in a context of peace after a war or to prevent a war: it could also be regarded as agreement (well the verse linked use the clear word used for a treaty of peace) or contract etc.

sallam سَلّم:

  • also may mean: to greet,

  • or to allow and to grant if it's in the context of approving,

  • it could also have the meaning to save or to protect or to keep if it's in the context of an injury or accident...!
  • Other meanings are to deliver or to give as here (if it's for example a letter) or to agree and to accept.

Other examples:

  • عليه السلام (alyhii as-Salam) which is translated peace be upon him: means also May the Prayers and Blessings of Allah and his Malaika be upon him.
  • صلی الله علیه و آله و سلم: All Prayers and Blessings of Allah be upon him and his relatives (family).

Conclusion or general hint

Briefly one could say that words of the root سَلَمَ like Salam/Salaam (noun)/sallam (verb)/Silm (noun)/sallama (verb) are in first place related with peace, words that are derivatives from Islam (Muslim (noun), aslim (verb)...) would be more related to submission and words that are derivatives of Salim/Saleem (noun) they would be more related to sane and safe!

And Allah knows best!

  • thank you. key phrase for me is that sallam is verb. i think it is good if you add also english translation so that sallam is translated with a verb, with somethng like "to protect", "to keep or to set him in peaceful place". – qdinar Nov 11 '15 at 14:08
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Concerning what you have inquired:

Sallam and salam - what is difference?

Briefly speaking, Sallam (سلم) looks often to be translated as "PEACE". e.g. as a famous phrase it is remarked: صلی الله علیه و آله و سلم، then it is translated as "peace be upon him and his household). Meanwhile, Sallam can be considered as a "Verb".

But the word SALAM can have some other meanings as well, especially it is used as a kind of greetings which means Hello. Among its meaning: Health, Peace, Hello ...

As well as this, Salam is deemed as a Name of Allah as well. On the other hand, it is considered as a "Noun"

Meanwhile, seemingly they have the same root of "سلم".


Reference:

  • have you added the phrase about sallam is verb after Medi Saif posted his answer, if yes, did you see/read his post, or not? this was key phrase for me to understand the difference, so i may select correct answer depending on who have written that first. – qdinar Nov 11 '15 at 14:13
  • Uh-huh, God bless you for being fair. Actually I didn’t copy of his opinion and after… (which is verb), I searched and finally perceived that I have not written it. But I think @Medi Saif wrote it before my edition. Since my edition was after his answer. Thus he is worthy of that. JazakAllah-Khaira for your attention. – اللهم صل علی محمد و آل محمد Nov 11 '15 at 15:28

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