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In the question "Would it be permissible for me to go out for lunch/dinner with a person of the opposite gender?" one of the answers mentions that "a public location, such as a public restaurant in a non-Muslim country, would also constitute khulwah."

Does this mean that a meeting at a public restaurant in a Muslim country would be permissible, when the purpose is specifically to decide whether to marry or not to marry a person?

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I think you have misinterpreted the answer of the other post. It clearly states

"An interesting scholarly discussion circulates around what "alone" means. The Arabic word is "khulwah." Scholars state that "alone" includes being in the presence of people who would not stop you from committing immorality. Therefore, a public location, such as a public restaurant in a non-Muslim country, would also constitute khulwah."

Read the bold lines. It mentions that even a public place would not be right if you are in the presence of people who would not stop you from committing evil.

The whole idea of that answer is if you are around people (relatives) who would not let you go astray from the purpose of the meeting, holding a meeting at such places is permissible.

jazakallah.

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Note that just because it happens to be a public restaurant in a Muslim instead of a non-Muslim country, it doesn't (necessarily) mean that other restaurant patrons are likely to be paying attention to you at all, much less prevent/protect you from doing anything inappropriate.

What is important in avoiding khulwah is that it's reasonable to expect others to notice and/or intervene so as to keep your interactions within acceptable limits. Chaperoning is the obvious (but not necessarily the only) solution.

It is impossible to just give a general ruling regarding "restaurants in a Muslim country"; there may or may not be public venues in Muslim (or even non-Muslim) countries where social interactions are moderated such that khulwah is not an issue. In my own (non-Muslim) country, even though the moderation is not according to Islamic mores, there is no shortage of moderated social events. I imagine one could find such in a Muslim country as well, but the responsibility is still on you to ensure that it's appropriate.

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