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Is it necessary to take-off the shoes while entering any religious (Islamic) site/place e.g. a mosque?

If so, why?

I don't find the argument saying that is because it's unclean, technically correct. The Islamic definition of clean is something that is not najis i.e. pak. So if one is sure that his/her shoes are dry (dry things are usually deemed clean) and/or pak. Then can he enter a religious site?

Neither do I find the argument that it is because of respect, sound. As we don't find similar instructions while carrying the Quran. If so, then did the muslims when they met (probably shook hands or hugged) the prophet(saww) take off their shoes?

Reference required

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    @mate, I reckon both items (respect & unclean together) can be as a adequate argument for taking off the shoes. Of course in regard to unclean, I think it can be related to the issue ofbeing dirty, not being Najis. Actually I mean whenever your shoes are dirty (not najis) by some dirty things (e.g. the rest of a rotten fruit or something else, you avoid attending your home in order to preventing making it dirty ... (as my personal opinion) / Good luck mate. – اللهم صل علی محمد و آل محمد Jun 23 '15 at 6:16
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No, it is not necessary.

But maybe its cause is for respect. There is one verse which points to it:

إِنِّي أَنَا رَبُّكَ فَاخْلَعْ نَعْلَيْكَ ۖ إِنَّكَ بِالْوَادِ الْمُقَدَّسِ طُوًى [٢٠:١٢

"O Moses, I am verily your Lord, so take off your shoes, for you are in the holy plain of Towa. [12]

  • I've read reports that the reason Moses was commanded to remove his shoes was because they were made of untanned (and hence impure) leather. – goldPseudo Jan 7 '14 at 20:41

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