Take the 2-minute tour ×
Islam Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Muslims, experts in Islam, and those interested in learning more about Islam. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Muslims offer prayer and recite Quran in arabic. What is the significance of Arabic language for worship according to Quran and Sunnah? Is there any hadith or verse of Quran that makes the Arabic language necessary for worship?

share|improve this question
1  
Good question !!! –  mtk Oct 30 '12 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The main goal is to set one language among Muslims. While the other reason might be that there's no exact translation of Quran in any language. Perhaps this is the reason that it remains unchanged after many decades which is what we rarely see in other religions.

However, Muslims may also say dua in their own words and languages for any issue they wish to communicate with God in the hope that God will answer their prayers.

share|improve this answer
    
Although your answer seems convincing but the question is whether there is any reference in Hadith and Quran that supports this justification? –  Hasan Khan Jun 19 '12 at 21:37
    
@HasanKhan: I mostly answered the "Why do Muslims offer prayers in Arabic?" part, I'll try to add it to my answer. –  Gigili Jun 19 '12 at 21:44
    
Hoping that God will answer the prayers is weakness of faith in Him. It should rather be He will answer. –  Bleeding Fingers Nov 24 '13 at 18:25

Asalamu wa alaikum,

Because The Quran was revealed in clear understandable Arabic and the recitation of the Quran in Arabic has so Much blessings, and because Islam started where Arabic was in, another reason is also to set a common language for Muslims, and Arabic has a lot of significance one because of the Qur'an. These are the reasons why we give the prayer in Arabic, another reason is ,

The Prophet May Peace be Upon Him said: (Pray like you see me pray), Riadussaliheen/in a narration from Bukari

And He Prayed in Arabic, so we follow Him and Pray in Arabic. But, if you are new to Islam, and don't know how to pray, then you learn how to pray and in it you can say:

سبحان الله، و الحمد لله، و لا إله إلا الله، و الله أكبر، و لا حول و لا قوة إلا بالله

Glory be to Allah, praise be to Allah, there is no god except Allah and Allah is Most great, there is no god except Allah and there is no power and no strength except with Allah

until you learn Surahs and the other things that is required for you to say in Salat/prayer. And you should strive your best to learn the language of the Quran/Arabic. Source

share|improve this answer
4  
You're missing the citation of hadith. –  Hasan Khan Jun 19 '12 at 21:36
1  
The answer is as @AlUmmat said, and also a reason is that a lot of words said in Arabic in prayer loses their full meaning if they are translated into another language. –  Sameh Kamal Jun 20 '12 at 16:06
1  
"But In salaat there is really no language barrier" oh yes there is unless you would say anything beside those which are Wajib (or even Mustahab). Maybe your answer is specifically true for Sunni brothers, but anyway can you back that claim of yourself with an authentic reference, please? –  owari Jan 9 '13 at 21:00

It seems that the root of Arabic language goes back to Ibrahim which is central in Islam's history (e.g. verse 2:129). Therefore Arabic is not just a random language, it is a language based on the language used by Ibrahim. Ibrahim left his community and created two new communities one of them being in Mecca and the origin of Arabs. The Arabic language has inherited the culture that Ibrahim has created and the words he has used. If one understand the significance of Ibrahim then understanding the significance of Arabic language is not difficult.

There has been some linguistic studies (e.g. by Toshihiko Izutsu) which show that although the language of Quran is Arabic it is significantly different from the Arabic language used by Arab population during the prophet's time (and it is probably also significantly different from the Arabic language used in daily life by Arabs). It seems that Quran is reshaping the Arabic language as it uses it.

I hope that this in addition to the fact that Quran is revealed in Arabic helps with understanding the importance of Arabic language in Islam.

share|improve this answer

You can translate a narrators book into different language with a very good translation, so that the reader of the later language understands the same things as the reader of the original language does.

However, this is not the same for the case of translating Quran. Quran is not a book written by human; it is brought down from sky (sema) by Allah himself. Its words and sentences have great precision in meaning. In order to understand a single ayat, one should analyze every word in the ayat, in both the usage of in other ayats and in etymological meaning.

Quran cannot be perfectly translated into another language. This doesn't mean that non-Arabic people shouldn't read Quran translations in their own languages. They can read Quran translations, but they must be aware that they are not reading the original Quran, and what they are reading is only a translation which hold only surface of the information; they are missing the deeper meanings.

Because of these reason, it is not a custom to read Quran in non-Arabic languages. However, there is no common vision about this matter. Some people say that Quran must be read in Arabic no matter what. Some say that it can/must be read in native language. Some say that it is important to maximize the comprehension of what you read (which roughly means that new readers should read their own language to take the "surface" of the information, as soon as they cover the "surface" they should switch back to Arabic to get the deeper vast informations.).

share|improve this answer

For just the remembrance of Allah, recitation of Quran in Arabic is not necessary. However, if you will insaallah get to know Quran at a more deeper level, you will realize that every word used in Quran has a specific purpose and there is no single exact substitute for any word. Furthermore, the roots of the words lets you see the connections between different concepts. By translating words you are hiding all these and eliminating the divinity of the Book. In short, you would want to preserve the original, so that when you recite Quran, your recitation is not restricted to the evident meaning or a single heaven/dimension.

Always remember, when you translate an ayat, you are reading from the Book, whereas when you read the original ayat, you are reading the Book (either you understand it or not). Thus, the aim should be to recite the original ayat, but also to either learn the verse you are reciting or (ideally) learn Arabic language itself.

Please also note that Allah says over and over in Quran that His kalam is revealed in Arabic. I believe this is because it is a language suitable for carrying this divine message. I don't know if it is the only, but at least it is one of those.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.